TASC Reading Practice Test

Try our free TASC Reading practice test. These practice questions are designed to help you prepare for the reading section of the TASC high school equivalency test. For this section you will be presented with passages of text that are followed by questions about the key ideas, the craft and structure of the passage, and word usage. There will be 50 questions which must be answered within 75 minutes.

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Question 1

Recycling Programs

Whether it’s saving milk jugs, sorting newspapers neatly into a pile, or placing unnecessary office paper in a corner recycling bin, the American recycling experiment continues. Consider the set of recycling statistics, reflected in the bar chart. It compares American recycling rates for select materials (paper, glass, metals and plastics) over a fifty year time frame (1960–2010), using ten year intervals.

r1

The large green bars on the graph show that between 1960 and 2010, paper recycling rates exceeded the recycling rates for the other materials. As the years pass, American recycling habits expanded, with beverage container recycling explaining much of the increase in glass, metals and plastics recycling in 1990. Starting in 1990, yard trimming recycling rates, not presented in the top bar chart, also occupied a larger portion of the average American’s recycling efforts. By 2010, Americans were recycling 57.5% of all their yard trimmings.

In many locations, changing technology and community practices contributed to recycling rate upward momentum over this same sixty year time frame. Reverse vending machines, invented during a 1990s recycling technology wave, now fill space in many retail locations around the country. State beverage container recycling laws and ease of use account for a portion of their long term success.

While circumstances exist where individuals might need a moment to stop and think through any particular recycling task, most modern recycling tasks, like using reverse vending machines, are quite simple, and accomplished by many individuals unreflective participation in organized beverage container recycling programs.

The 9,000 curbside recycling programs in existence between 1985 and 2005 also contributed to increased aggregate recycling rates. Curbside recycling schedules that run concurrent with local garbage collection schedules allow households to schedule garbage and recycling chores for the same day. All curbside recycling programs follow some general rules. Five of the most common are presented below.

  • Follow Sorting Guidelines
  • Keep Recycled Material Clean
  • Know Your Recycling Bins
  • Know Your Recycling Day
  • In Doubt, Leave it Out
Creating a successful home, school, or work recycling program takes very little effort, while creating substantial environmental and economic benefits. Recycling practices easily blend into modern American life. Most successful recycling programs begin and end with locating their recycling corner. Strategically placing a recycling center in a corner of a high traffic location often works to attract individual attention along with providing a centralized waste removal location.

This passage is adapted from “Recycling Statistics and Facts,” Green Nature, Patricia A. Michaels, 2011.
 
According to the chart provided, which of the following materials was most commonly recycled in 2010?

A
Paper/Paperboard
B
Metals
C
Glass
D
Plastics
Question 1 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (A). In 2010, the green bar, representing Paper/Paperboard recycling, is higher than the other bars in the year 2010.
Question 2

Recycling Programs

Whether it’s saving milk jugs, sorting newspapers neatly into a pile, or placing unnecessary office paper in a corner recycling bin, the American recycling experiment continues. Consider the set of recycling statistics, reflected in the bar chart. It compares American recycling rates for select materials (paper, glass, metals and plastics) over a fifty year time frame (1960–2010), using ten year intervals.

r1

The large green bars on the graph show that between 1960 and 2010, paper recycling rates exceeded the recycling rates for the other materials. As the years pass, American recycling habits expanded, with beverage container recycling explaining much of the increase in glass, metals and plastics recycling in 1990. Starting in 1990, yard trimming recycling rates, not presented in the top bar chart, also occupied a larger portion of the average American’s recycling efforts. By 2010, Americans were recycling 57.5% of all their yard trimmings.

In many locations, changing technology and community practices contributed to recycling rate upward momentum over this same sixty year time frame. Reverse vending machines, invented during a 1990s recycling technology wave, now fill space in many retail locations around the country. State beverage container recycling laws and ease of use account for a portion of their long term success.

While circumstances exist where individuals might need a moment to stop and think through any particular recycling task, most modern recycling tasks, like using reverse vending machines, are quite simple, and accomplished by many individuals unreflective participation in organized beverage container recycling programs.

The 9,000 curbside recycling programs in existence between 1985 and 2005 also contributed to increased aggregate recycling rates. Curbside recycling schedules that run concurrent with local garbage collection schedules allow households to schedule garbage and recycling chores for the same day. All curbside recycling programs follow some general rules. Five of the most common are presented below.

  • Follow Sorting Guidelines
  • Keep Recycled Material Clean
  • Know Your Recycling Bins
  • Know Your Recycling Day
  • In Doubt, Leave it Out
Creating a successful home, school, or work recycling program takes very little effort, while creating substantial environmental and economic benefits. Recycling practices easily blend into modern American life. Most successful recycling programs begin and end with locating their recycling corner. Strategically placing a recycling center in a corner of a high traffic location often works to attract individual attention along with providing a centralized waste removal location.

This passage is adapted from “Recycling Statistics and Facts,” Green Nature, Patricia A. Michaels, 2011.
 
According to the text, what are TWO factors that have made reverse vending machines a success?

A
state laws
B
customer payments
C
federal regulations
D
ease of use
E
habits
F
curbside recycling programs
Question 2 Explanation: 
The correct answers are (A) and (D). The phrase “according to the text” indicates that the correct answer is explicitly stated in the passage. Skim through to find where the passage mentions reverse vending machines and read carefully to find the answer. After mentioning reverse vending machines, the article reads, “State beverage container recycling laws and ease of use account for a portion of their long term success.”
Question 3

Recycling Programs

Whether it’s saving milk jugs, sorting newspapers neatly into a pile, or placing unnecessary office paper in a corner recycling bin, the American recycling experiment continues. Consider the set of recycling statistics, reflected in the bar chart. It compares American recycling rates for select materials (paper, glass, metals and plastics) over a fifty year time frame (1960–2010), using ten year intervals.

r1

The large green bars on the graph show that between 1960 and 2010, paper recycling rates exceeded the recycling rates for the other materials. As the years pass, American recycling habits expanded, with beverage container recycling explaining much of the increase in glass, metals and plastics recycling in 1990. Starting in 1990, yard trimming recycling rates, not presented in the top bar chart, also occupied a larger portion of the average American’s recycling efforts. By 2010, Americans were recycling 57.5% of all their yard trimmings.

In many locations, changing technology and community practices contributed to recycling rate upward momentum over this same sixty year time frame. Reverse vending machines, invented during a 1990s recycling technology wave, now fill space in many retail locations around the country. State beverage container recycling laws and ease of use account for a portion of their long term success.

While circumstances exist where individuals might need a moment to stop and think through any particular recycling task, most modern recycling tasks, like using reverse vending machines, are quite simple, and accomplished by many individuals unreflective participation in organized beverage container recycling programs.

The 9,000 curbside recycling programs in existence between 1985 and 2005 also contributed to increased aggregate recycling rates. Curbside recycling schedules that run concurrent with local garbage collection schedules allow households to schedule garbage and recycling chores for the same day. All curbside recycling programs follow some general rules. Five of the most common are presented below.

  • Follow Sorting Guidelines
  • Keep Recycled Material Clean
  • Know Your Recycling Bins
  • Know Your Recycling Day
  • In Doubt, Leave it Out
Creating a successful home, school, or work recycling program takes very little effort, while creating substantial environmental and economic benefits. Recycling practices easily blend into modern American life. Most successful recycling programs begin and end with locating their recycling corner. Strategically placing a recycling center in a corner of a high traffic location often works to attract individual attention along with providing a centralized waste removal location.

This passage is adapted from “Recycling Statistics and Facts,” Green Nature, Patricia A. Michaels, 2011.
 
Read this excerpt from the text

The 9,000 curbside recycling programs in existence between 1985 and 2005 also contributed to increased aggregate recycling rates.
 
As used in the excerpt, what is the meaning of the word aggregate?

A
community
B
plastic
C
total
D
official
Question 3 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). As used in this context, aggregate means: the total sum after adding together two or more amounts. The article is referring to the overall increase in recycling rates of all items combined.
Question 4

Recycling Programs

Whether it’s saving milk jugs, sorting newspapers neatly into a pile, or placing unnecessary office paper in a corner recycling bin, the American recycling experiment continues. Consider the set of recycling statistics, reflected in the bar chart. It compares American recycling rates for select materials (paper, glass, metals and plastics) over a fifty year time frame (1960–2010), using ten year intervals.

r1

The large green bars on the graph show that between 1960 and 2010, paper recycling rates exceeded the recycling rates for the other materials. As the years pass, American recycling habits expanded, with beverage container recycling explaining much of the increase in glass, metals and plastics recycling in 1990. Starting in 1990, yard trimming recycling rates, not presented in the top bar chart, also occupied a larger portion of the average American’s recycling efforts. By 2010, Americans were recycling 57.5% of all their yard trimmings.

In many locations, changing technology and community practices contributed to recycling rate upward momentum over this same sixty year time frame. Reverse vending machines, invented during a 1990s recycling technology wave, now fill space in many retail locations around the country. State beverage container recycling laws and ease of use account for a portion of their long term success.

While circumstances exist where individuals might need a moment to stop and think through any particular recycling task, most modern recycling tasks, like using reverse vending machines, are quite simple, and accomplished by many individuals unreflective participation in organized beverage container recycling programs.

The 9,000 curbside recycling programs in existence between 1985 and 2005 also contributed to increased aggregate recycling rates. Curbside recycling schedules that run concurrent with local garbage collection schedules allow households to schedule garbage and recycling chores for the same day. All curbside recycling programs follow some general rules. Five of the most common are presented below.

  • Follow Sorting Guidelines
  • Keep Recycled Material Clean
  • Know Your Recycling Bins
  • Know Your Recycling Day
  • In Doubt, Leave it Out
Creating a successful home, school, or work recycling program takes very little effort, while creating substantial environmental and economic benefits. Recycling practices easily blend into modern American life. Most successful recycling programs begin and end with locating their recycling corner. Strategically placing a recycling center in a corner of a high traffic location often works to attract individual attention along with providing a centralized waste removal location.

This passage is adapted from “Recycling Statistics and Facts,” Green Nature, Patricia A. Michaels, 2011.
 
Read this excerpt from the text

Curbside recycling schedules that run concurrent with local garbage collection schedules allow households to schedule garbage and recycling chores for the same day.
 
How does the author use this statement to develop the argument that recycling is a relatively easy activity for the average person?

A
By providing the specific collection times for the recycling bins, and indicating what is picked up on which days.
B
By demonstrating how materials are cleaned, sorted, and placed into specific bins.
C
By outlining the various bins required for recycling and noting how simple it is to sort the recycled materials.
D
By showing there is minimal inconvenience to homeowners to recycle, since they already put out garbage bins once a week.
Question 4 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). No specific information about sorting is provided, and the other incorrect answer choices describe processes that are relatively complicated when compared with putting out garbage bins once a week. The alignment of the curbside recycling schedules with the local garbage collection schedules makes it easy for households to simultaneously dispose of trash while they recycle.
Question 5

Recycling Programs

Whether it’s saving milk jugs, sorting newspapers neatly into a pile, or placing unnecessary office paper in a corner recycling bin, the American recycling experiment continues. Consider the set of recycling statistics, reflected in the bar chart. It compares American recycling rates for select materials (paper, glass, metals and plastics) over a fifty year time frame (1960–2010), using ten year intervals.

r1

The large green bars on the graph show that between 1960 and 2010, paper recycling rates exceeded the recycling rates for the other materials. As the years pass, American recycling habits expanded, with beverage container recycling explaining much of the increase in glass, metals and plastics recycling in 1990. Starting in 1990, yard trimming recycling rates, not presented in the top bar chart, also occupied a larger portion of the average American’s recycling efforts. By 2010, Americans were recycling 57.5% of all their yard trimmings.

In many locations, changing technology and community practices contributed to recycling rate upward momentum over this same sixty year time frame. Reverse vending machines, invented during a 1990s recycling technology wave, now fill space in many retail locations around the country. State beverage container recycling laws and ease of use account for a portion of their long term success.

While circumstances exist where individuals might need a moment to stop and think through any particular recycling task, most modern recycling tasks, like using reverse vending machines, are quite simple, and accomplished by many individuals unreflective participation in organized beverage container recycling programs.

The 9,000 curbside recycling programs in existence between 1985 and 2005 also contributed to increased aggregate recycling rates. Curbside recycling schedules that run concurrent with local garbage collection schedules allow households to schedule garbage and recycling chores for the same day. All curbside recycling programs follow some general rules. Five of the most common are presented below.

  • Follow Sorting Guidelines
  • Keep Recycled Material Clean
  • Know Your Recycling Bins
  • Know Your Recycling Day
  • In Doubt, Leave it Out
Creating a successful home, school, or work recycling program takes very little effort, while creating substantial environmental and economic benefits. Recycling practices easily blend into modern American life. Most successful recycling programs begin and end with locating their recycling corner. Strategically placing a recycling center in a corner of a high traffic location often works to attract individual attention along with providing a centralized waste removal location.

This passage is adapted from “Recycling Statistics and Facts,” Green Nature, Patricia A. Michaels, 2011.
 
In the first paragraph, the author uses the phrase American recycling experiment to show

A
that Americans will only recycle on an experimental basis
B
that America has not figured out exactly how recycling programs should be implemented
C
that recycling in America will only continue until the experiment is completed
D
that other countries are more committed to recycling than America
Question 5 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). In the context of this passage, the word experiment means "the process of testing." The author uses this phrase to suggest that there is an ongoing effort in America to figure out the best policies for recycling programs and the best ways to encourage household participation.
Question 6

The Road Not Taken
by Robert Frost

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I —
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

(From The Poetry of Robert Frost by Robert Frost, edited by Edward Connery Lathem. Copyright © 1969 by Holt Rinehart and Winston, Inc.)

 
What is the meaning of the word diverged in the first stanza?

A
entwined
B
separated
C
removed
D
paved
Question 6 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). The author is standing at a crossroads where two roads separate away from each other and the author must choose which of the two roads to take.
Question 7

The Road Not Taken
by Robert Frost

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I —
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

(From The Poetry of Robert Frost by Robert Frost, edited by Edward Connery Lathem. Copyright © 1969 by Holt Rinehart and Winston, Inc.)
 
Select TWO major themes of the poem.

A
Choices
B
Heaven
C
Passage of Time
D
Honor
E
Gratitude
F
Romantic Love
Question 7 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (A) and (C). The poem primarily deals with how choices we make in the present will be seen by our future selves, and whether the choices are meaningfully different in hindsight. “Choices” and “Passage of Time,” therefore, are the correct themes out of these options. None of the other options are themes present in this poem.
Question 8

The Road Not Taken
by Robert Frost

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I —
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

(From The Poetry of Robert Frost by Robert Frost, edited by Edward Connery Lathem. Copyright © 1969 by Holt Rinehart and Winston, Inc.)
 
Why does the author state, “In leaves no step had trodden black?”

A
To show one path was paved and the other was not.
B
To indicate one path had been used more frequently by other travelers.
C
To illustrate the similarities between the paths.
D
To reveal the yellow woods are not traveled through very often.
Question 8 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). Any time a specific line is referenced, it is crucial to reread the context in which the specific line is embedded. This entails reading the sentences prior and afterward to gain a better idea of how the specific reference functions. In this case, the author is showing the reader that both paths “equally lay,” meaning that there is no significant difference between the two. This is part of the reason why the author is indecisive.
Question 9

The Road Not Taken
by Robert Frost

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I —
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

(From The Poetry of Robert Frost by Robert Frost, edited by Edward Connery Lathem. Copyright © 1969 by Holt Rinehart and Winston, Inc.)
 
Read the last stanza of the poem. What is ironic about the author’s tone in this final stanza?

A
The author believes he can see into the future, when that is not possible.
B
The author believes that he took the less-traveled road, even though he earlier claimed the roads to be the same.
C
The author believes he will remember his choice “ages and ages hence.”
D
The author believes his choice will interest others in the future, but it will not.
Question 9 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). The prior stanzas discuss how similar both roads are, and how that contributed to the author’s indecision. Suddenly, in this stanza, the author claims that he took the less traveled road, even though he earlier described the roads to “equally lay.”
Question 10

The Road Not Taken
by Robert Frost

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I —
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

(From The Poetry of Robert Frost by Robert Frost, edited by Edward Connery Lathem. Copyright © 1969 by Holt Rinehart and Winston, Inc.)
 
What two periods of time are discussed in the poem?

A
The past and the near future.
B
The present and the near future.
C
The past and the far future.
D
The present and the far future.
Question 10 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). The verbs in the poem are all past tense, so it can be concluded that the decision made in the yellow woods occurred in the past. The phrase “ages and ages hence” in the final stanza indicates that the author is looking at a time period far in the future as ‘hence’ refers to the future, and ‘ages and ages’ indicates a period especially far in the future.
Question 11

Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy

So let us begin a new remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof. Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate. And if a beachhead of cooperation may push back the jungle of suspicion, let both sides join in creating a new endeavor, not a new balance of power, but a new world of law, where the strong are just and the weak secure and the peace preserved.

All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days. Nor will it be finished in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this Administration, nor even perhaps in our lifetime on this planet. But let us begin.

In your hands, my fellow citizens, more than mine, will rest the final success or failure of our course. Since this country was founded, each generation of Americans has been summoned to give testimony to its national loyalty. The graves of young Americans who answered the call to service surround the globe.

Now the trumpet summons us again; not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are; but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation" — a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease and war itself. Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort?

In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shrink from this responsibility; I welcome it. I do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it — and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.

And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.

Finally, whether you are citizens of America or citizens of the world, ask of us here the same high standards of strength and sacrifice which we ask of you. With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on Earth God's work must truly be our own.
 
What is President Kennedy’s main purpose in this address?

A
to encourage Americans to be more civil with each other and with America’s foreign allies
B
to ask Congress to give the executive branch more power in military affairs
C
to illustrate the precarious position of America in foreign affairs
D
to rally Americans to serve their country
Question 11 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). Kennedy’s main purpose is best encapsulated in the sentence, “And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country.” Kennedy is urging Americans to rise up and promote freedom domestically and abroad.
Question 12

Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy

So let us begin a new remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof. Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate. And if a beachhead of cooperation may push back the jungle of suspicion, let both sides join in creating a new endeavor, not a new balance of power, but a new world of law, where the strong are just and the weak secure and the peace preserved.

All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days. Nor will it be finished in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this Administration, nor even perhaps in our lifetime on this planet. But let us begin.

In your hands, my fellow citizens, more than mine, will rest the final success or failure of our course. Since this country was founded, each generation of Americans has been summoned to give testimony to its national loyalty. The graves of young Americans who answered the call to service surround the globe.

Now the trumpet summons us again; not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are; but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation" — a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease and war itself. Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort?

In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shrink from this responsibility; I welcome it. I do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it — and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.

And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.

Finally, whether you are citizens of America or citizens of the world, ask of us here the same high standards of strength and sacrifice which we ask of you. With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on Earth God's work must truly be our own.
 
In the final paragraph, what hope does President Kennedy express about his government?

A
that it will be better than the preceding government
B
that it will be held accountable by the people
C
that it will make future generations proud
D
that it will be ruled by God’s will
Question 12 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). In the final paragraph, Kennedy states, “ask of us here the same high standards of strength and sacrifice which we ask of you.” He encourages the people to hold his government accountable. Nowhere in the final paragraph does Kennedy mention the preceding government or future generation. Answers (C) and (D) are also unsupported by the final paragraph. God is mentioned, but Kennedy does not express a hope that his government will be ruled by God’s will.
Question 13

Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy

So let us begin a new remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof. Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate. And if a beachhead of cooperation may push back the jungle of suspicion, let both sides join in creating a new endeavor, not a new balance of power, but a new world of law, where the strong are just and the weak secure and the peace preserved.

All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days. Nor will it be finished in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this Administration, nor even perhaps in our lifetime on this planet. But let us begin.

In your hands, my fellow citizens, more than mine, will rest the final success or failure of our course. Since this country was founded, each generation of Americans has been summoned to give testimony to its national loyalty. The graves of young Americans who answered the call to service surround the globe.

Now the trumpet summons us again; not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are; but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation" — a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease and war itself. Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort?

In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shrink from this responsibility; I welcome it. I do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it — and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.

And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.

Finally, whether you are citizens of America or citizens of the world, ask of us here the same high standards of strength and sacrifice which we ask of you. With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on Earth God's work must truly be our own.
 
What is “the trumpet” a metaphor for in the beginning of the fourth paragraph?

A
a call to bear arms and fight foreign dictatorships
B
a call to overcome domestic strife and petty differences
C
a call to build up the military and allocate more tax revenue to that purpose
D
a call to endure the challenges that come with fighting tyranny
Question 13 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). Immediately after mentioning the “trumpet,” Kennedy insists it is NOT a call to bear arms, so (A) and (C) are not logical answers. The scope of the paragraph, however, is international as well as national, so the “trumpet” is beyond the “domestic” concerns mentioned in choice (B). Choice (D) is the best rephrase of the information in the paragraph.
Question 14

Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy

So let us begin a new remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof. Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate. And if a beachhead of cooperation may push back the jungle of suspicion, let both sides join in creating a new endeavor, not a new balance of power, but a new world of law, where the strong are just and the weak secure and the peace preserved.

All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days. Nor will it be finished in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this Administration, nor even perhaps in our lifetime on this planet. But let us begin.

In your hands, my fellow citizens, more than mine, will rest the final success or failure of our course. Since this country was founded, each generation of Americans has been summoned to give testimony to its national loyalty. The graves of young Americans who answered the call to service surround the globe.

Now the trumpet summons us again; not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are; but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation" — a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease and war itself. Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort?

In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shrink from this responsibility; I welcome it. I do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it — and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.

And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.

Finally, whether you are citizens of America or citizens of the world, ask of us here the same high standards of strength and sacrifice which we ask of you. With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on Earth God's work must truly be our own.
 
How does Kennedy attempt to recruit Americans to join the fight against tyranny?

A
by placing it in a historical context
B
by boasting of his personal bravery and confidence, and encouraging American pride
C
by outlining a plan of action for future American conflicts
D
by criticizing the inaction of other countries
Question 14 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (A). Kennedy inspires his audience by placing the fight against tyranny in a global, historical, and immediate context. He does not boast of his own experiences, he does not outline a specific plan of action regarding future conflicts, nor does he criticize the inaction of other countries. In paragraph 3 he places the success of “our course” in the hands of the people and puts the situation in perspective by comparing the current situation with that of earlier generations. By doing so, Kennedy introduces a historical argument meant to encourage the people to continue working toward success.
Question 15

Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy

So let us begin a new remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof. Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate. And if a beachhead of cooperation may push back the jungle of suspicion, let both sides join in creating a new endeavor, not a new balance of power, but a new world of law, where the strong are just and the weak secure and the peace preserved.

All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days. Nor will it be finished in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this Administration, nor even perhaps in our lifetime on this planet. But let us begin.

In your hands, my fellow citizens, more than mine, will rest the final success or failure of our course. Since this country was founded, each generation of Americans has been summoned to give testimony to its national loyalty. The graves of young Americans who answered the call to service surround the globe.

Now the trumpet summons us again; not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are; but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation" — a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease and war itself. Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort?

In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shrink from this responsibility; I welcome it. I do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it — and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.

And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.

Finally, whether you are citizens of America or citizens of the world, ask of us here the same high standards of strength and sacrifice which we ask of you. With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on Earth God's work must truly be our own.
 
Which of these statements most strongly supports your response to the previous question?

(Use the left arrow below to go back and review the previous question.)

A
In your hands, my fellow citizens, more than mine, will rest the final success or failure of our course.
B
In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger.
C
I do not shrink from this responsibility; I welcome it.
D
Finally, whether you are citizens of America or citizens of the world, ask of us here the same high standards of strength and sacrifice which we ask of you.
Question 15 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). The only statement here that places the conflict in a historical context is choice (B), since it discusses the “long history of the world,” and implicitly compares the circumstances of the current generation with that of previous generations.
Question 16

Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy

So let us begin a new remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof. Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate. And if a beachhead of cooperation may push back the jungle of suspicion, let both sides join in creating a new endeavor, not a new balance of power, but a new world of law, where the strong are just and the weak secure and the peace preserved.

All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days. Nor will it be finished in the first one thousand days, nor in the life of this Administration, nor even perhaps in our lifetime on this planet. But let us begin.

In your hands, my fellow citizens, more than mine, will rest the final success or failure of our course. Since this country was founded, each generation of Americans has been summoned to give testimony to its national loyalty. The graves of young Americans who answered the call to service surround the globe.

Now the trumpet summons us again; not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are; but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation" — a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease and war itself. Can we forge against these enemies a grand and global alliance, North and South, East and West, that can assure a more fruitful life for all mankind? Will you join in that historic effort?

In the long history of the world, only a few generations have been granted the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shrink from this responsibility; I welcome it. I do not believe that any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it — and the glow from that fire can truly light the world.

And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country. My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.

Finally, whether you are citizens of America or citizens of the world, ask of us here the same high standards of strength and sacrifice which we ask of you. With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on Earth God's work must truly be our own.
 
Read this excerpt from the text

Now the trumpet summons us again; not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are; but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, "rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation" — a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease and war itself.
 
What is the most likely meaning of twilight struggle?

A
hard-won victories
B
unwinnable struggle
C
ongoing battle
D
never-ending separation
Question 16 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). The word “twilight” refers to a period between night and sunrise or sunset; it can also refer to a period of decline or uncertainty. The word “struggle” means a conflict or fight. The phrase “long twilight struggle” indicates an ongoing period of uncertainty during which America must continue to struggle against the common enemies of man. Many of the key words point to this twilight struggle as an ongoing issue. The word “unwinnable” in answer choice (B) is too extreme to be the correct option, as the overall tone of the excerpt suggests that as long as the people make efforts, the battle can be won.
Question 17

The History of Girl Scout Cookies

For nearly 100 years, Girl Scouts and their enthusiastic supporters have helped ensure the success of the iconic annual cookie sale — and they’ve had fun, developed valuable life skills, and made their communities a better place every step of the way.

Girl Scout Cookies had their earliest beginnings in the kitchens and ovens of our girl members, with moms volunteering as technical advisers. The sale of cookies as a way to finance troop activities began as early as 1917, five years after Juliette Gordon Low started Girl Scouts in the United States, when the Mistletoe Troop in Muskogee, Oklahoma, baked cookies and sold them in its high school cafeteria as a service project.

In July 1922, The American Girl magazine, published by Girl Scouts of the USA, featured an article by Florence E. Neil, a local director in Chicago, Illinois. Miss Neil provided a cookie recipe that had been given to the council’s 2,000 Girl Scouts. She estimated the approximate cost of ingredients for six- to seven-dozen cookies to be 26 to 36 cents. The cookies, she suggested, could be sold by troops for 25 or 30 cents per dozen.

In 1933, Girl Scouts of Greater Philadelphia Council baked cookies and sold them in the city’s gas and electric company windows. The price was just 23 cents per box of 44 cookies, or six boxes for $1.24! Girls developed their marketing and business skills and raised funds for their local Girl Scout council. A year later, Greater Philadelphia took cookie sales to the next level, becoming the first council to sell commercially baked cookies.

In 1935, the Girl Scout Federation of Greater New York raised money through the sale of commercially baked cookies. Buying its own die in the shape of a trefoil, the group used the words “Girl Scout Cookies” on the box. In 1936, the national Girl Scout organization began the process of licensing the first commercial bakers to produce cookies that would be sold nationwide by girls in Girl Scout councils.

Enthusiasm for Girl Scout Cookies spread nationwide. By 1937, more than 125 Girl Scout councils reported holding cookie sales. In 1951, Girl Scout Cookies came in three varieties: Sandwich, Shortbread, and Chocolate Mints (now known as Thin Mints). By 1966, a number of varieties were available. Among the best sellers were Chocolate Mint (now known as Thin Mints), Shortbread, and Peanut Butter Sandwich cookies. Girl Scout Cookies for sale during the 1970s included Thin Mints, Peanut Butter Sandwich/Do-si-dos®, and Shortbread/Trefoils® cookies, plus four additional choices.

Early in the twenty-first century, every Girl Scout Cookie had a mission. New cookie box designs, introduced in fall of 2000, were bold and bright, capturing the spirit of Girl Scouting. Two licensed bakers produced a maximum of eight varieties, and all cookies were kosher. And, much to the excitement of our youngest Girl Scouts, Daisies started selling cookies!

This passage is adapted from “Girl Scout Cookie History,” GirlScouts.org.
 
The details about the specific types of cookies sold (Trefoil, Thin Mints, etc.) serve to

A
highlight progress in the nutritional content of the cookies
B
show how the types of cookies sold have developed over time
C
explain why certain types of cookies are preferred over others
D
describe how the specific cookies are made and packaged
Question 17 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). The passage mentions the types of cookies sold in each decade in order to explain when certain types of cookies were first introduced. Nutrition is only mentioned briefly in the final paragraph, and the passage does not discuss the preferences of cookies or how they are specifically made.
Question 18

The History of Girl Scout Cookies

For nearly 100 years, Girl Scouts and their enthusiastic supporters have helped ensure the success of the iconic annual cookie sale — and they’ve had fun, developed valuable life skills, and made their communities a better place every step of the way.

Girl Scout Cookies had their earliest beginnings in the kitchens and ovens of our girl members, with moms volunteering as technical advisers. The sale of cookies as a way to finance troop activities began as early as 1917, five years after Juliette Gordon Low started Girl Scouts in the United States, when the Mistletoe Troop in Muskogee, Oklahoma, baked cookies and sold them in its high school cafeteria as a service project.

In July 1922, The American Girl magazine, published by Girl Scouts of the USA, featured an article by Florence E. Neil, a local director in Chicago, Illinois. Miss Neil provided a cookie recipe that had been given to the council’s 2,000 Girl Scouts. She estimated the approximate cost of ingredients for six- to seven-dozen cookies to be 26 to 36 cents. The cookies, she suggested, could be sold by troops for 25 or 30 cents per dozen.

In 1933, Girl Scouts of Greater Philadelphia Council baked cookies and sold them in the city’s gas and electric company windows. The price was just 23 cents per box of 44 cookies, or six boxes for $1.24! Girls developed their marketing and business skills and raised funds for their local Girl Scout council. A year later, Greater Philadelphia took cookie sales to the next level, becoming the first council to sell commercially baked cookies.

In 1935, the Girl Scout Federation of Greater New York raised money through the sale of commercially baked cookies. Buying its own die in the shape of a trefoil, the group used the words “Girl Scout Cookies” on the box. In 1936, the national Girl Scout organization began the process of licensing the first commercial bakers to produce cookies that would be sold nationwide by girls in Girl Scout councils.

Enthusiasm for Girl Scout Cookies spread nationwide. By 1937, more than 125 Girl Scout councils reported holding cookie sales. In 1951, Girl Scout Cookies came in three varieties: Sandwich, Shortbread, and Chocolate Mints (now known as Thin Mints). By 1966, a number of varieties were available. Among the best sellers were Chocolate Mint (now known as Thin Mints), Shortbread, and Peanut Butter Sandwich cookies. Girl Scout Cookies for sale during the 1970s included Thin Mints, Peanut Butter Sandwich/Do-si-dos®, and Shortbread/Trefoils® cookies, plus four additional choices.

Early in the twenty-first century, every Girl Scout Cookie had a mission. New cookie box designs, introduced in fall of 2000, were bold and bright, capturing the spirit of Girl Scouting. Two licensed bakers produced a maximum of eight varieties, and all cookies were kosher. And, much to the excitement of our youngest Girl Scouts, Daisies started selling cookies!

This passage is adapted from “Girl Scout Cookie History,” GirlScouts.org.
 
What inference can be made about the history of Girl Scout cookies?

A
Girl Scout cookies were not popular during World War II.
B
Before the 21st century, no one wanted to buy cookies from Daisies.
C
Thin Mints are the most popular type of Girl Scout cookie.
D
Girl Scouts did not bake their own cookies after 1940.
Question 18 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). An inference is a conclusion based on presented evidence. It is not usually explicitly stated, and is instead assumed to be true because information that is explicitly stated supports that particular conclusion. In this case, it is mentioned that the Girl Scouts switched over to commercially-licensed bakers to produce their cookies in 1936. It is reasonable to assume that the Girl Scouts did not sell handmade cookies after 1940, and instead focused on marketing and selling the cookies.
Question 19

The History of Girl Scout Cookies

For nearly 100 years, Girl Scouts and their enthusiastic supporters have helped ensure the success of the iconic annual cookie sale — and they’ve had fun, developed valuable life skills, and made their communities a better place every step of the way.

Girl Scout Cookies had their earliest beginnings in the kitchens and ovens of our girl members, with moms volunteering as technical advisers. The sale of cookies as a way to finance troop activities began as early as 1917, five years after Juliette Gordon Low started Girl Scouts in the United States, when the Mistletoe Troop in Muskogee, Oklahoma, baked cookies and sold them in its high school cafeteria as a service project.

In July 1922, The American Girl magazine, published by Girl Scouts of the USA, featured an article by Florence E. Neil, a local director in Chicago, Illinois. Miss Neil provided a cookie recipe that had been given to the council’s 2,000 Girl Scouts. She estimated the approximate cost of ingredients for six- to seven-dozen cookies to be 26 to 36 cents. The cookies, she suggested, could be sold by troops for 25 or 30 cents per dozen.

In 1933, Girl Scouts of Greater Philadelphia Council baked cookies and sold them in the city’s gas and electric company windows. The price was just 23 cents per box of 44 cookies, or six boxes for $1.24! Girls developed their marketing and business skills and raised funds for their local Girl Scout council. A year later, Greater Philadelphia took cookie sales to the next level, becoming the first council to sell commercially baked cookies.

In 1935, the Girl Scout Federation of Greater New York raised money through the sale of commercially baked cookies. Buying its own die in the shape of a trefoil, the group used the words “Girl Scout Cookies” on the box. In 1936, the national Girl Scout organization began the process of licensing the first commercial bakers to produce cookies that would be sold nationwide by girls in Girl Scout councils.

Enthusiasm for Girl Scout Cookies spread nationwide. By 1937, more than 125 Girl Scout councils reported holding cookie sales. In 1951, Girl Scout Cookies came in three varieties: Sandwich, Shortbread, and Chocolate Mints (now known as Thin Mints). By 1966, a number of varieties were available. Among the best sellers were Chocolate Mint (now known as Thin Mints), Shortbread, and Peanut Butter Sandwich cookies. Girl Scout Cookies for sale during the 1970s included Thin Mints, Peanut Butter Sandwich/Do-si-dos®, and Shortbread/Trefoils® cookies, plus four additional choices.

Early in the twenty-first century, every Girl Scout Cookie had a mission. New cookie box designs, introduced in fall of 2000, were bold and bright, capturing the spirit of Girl Scouting. Two licensed bakers produced a maximum of eight varieties, and all cookies were kosher. And, much to the excitement of our youngest Girl Scouts, Daisies started selling cookies!

This passage is adapted from “Girl Scout Cookie History,” GirlScouts.org.
 
How does the first paragraph of the passage relate to the rest of the passage?

A
The first paragraph mentions a specific viewpoint on a topic, and the other paragraphs present background information on this topic.
B
The first paragraph gives a general overview, and the remaining paragraphs provide a sequential development of that idea.
C
The first paragraph provides a thesis statement, and the rest of the paragraphs attempt to persuade the reader to agree with that thesis.
D
The first paragraph describes a plan of action, and the rest of the paragraphs provide a chronological review of that plan.
Question 19 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). The first paragraph introduces the main idea — the nearly 100 year old annual Girl Scout cookie sale. The remaining paragraphs sequentially describe the events that took place across those 100 years. Regarding the other answer choices, the tone is descriptive rather than persuasive, the passage lacks a thesis and a plan of action, and the viewpoint of the author is interested but not emphatic.
Question 20

The History of Girl Scout Cookies

For nearly 100 years, Girl Scouts and their enthusiastic supporters have helped ensure the success of the iconic annual cookie sale — and they’ve had fun, developed valuable life skills, and made their communities a better place every step of the way.

Girl Scout Cookies had their earliest beginnings in the kitchens and ovens of our girl members, with moms volunteering as technical advisers. The sale of cookies as a way to finance troop activities began as early as 1917, five years after Juliette Gordon Low started Girl Scouts in the United States, when the Mistletoe Troop in Muskogee, Oklahoma, baked cookies and sold them in its high school cafeteria as a service project.

In July 1922, The American Girl magazine, published by Girl Scouts of the USA, featured an article by Florence E. Neil, a local director in Chicago, Illinois. Miss Neil provided a cookie recipe that had been given to the council’s 2,000 Girl Scouts. She estimated the approximate cost of ingredients for six- to seven-dozen cookies to be 26 to 36 cents. The cookies, she suggested, could be sold by troops for 25 or 30 cents per dozen.

In 1933, Girl Scouts of Greater Philadelphia Council baked cookies and sold them in the city’s gas and electric company windows. The price was just 23 cents per box of 44 cookies, or six boxes for $1.24! Girls developed their marketing and business skills and raised funds for their local Girl Scout council. A year later, Greater Philadelphia took cookie sales to the next level, becoming the first council to sell commercially baked cookies.

In 1935, the Girl Scout Federation of Greater New York raised money through the sale of commercially baked cookies. Buying its own die in the shape of a trefoil, the group used the words “Girl Scout Cookies” on the box. In 1936, the national Girl Scout organization began the process of licensing the first commercial bakers to produce cookies that would be sold nationwide by girls in Girl Scout councils.

Enthusiasm for Girl Scout Cookies spread nationwide. By 1937, more than 125 Girl Scout councils reported holding cookie sales. In 1951, Girl Scout Cookies came in three varieties: Sandwich, Shortbread, and Chocolate Mints (now known as Thin Mints). By 1966, a number of varieties were available. Among the best sellers were Chocolate Mint (now known as Thin Mints), Shortbread, and Peanut Butter Sandwich cookies. Girl Scout Cookies for sale during the 1970s included Thin Mints, Peanut Butter Sandwich/Do-si-dos®, and Shortbread/Trefoils® cookies, plus four additional choices.

Early in the twenty-first century, every Girl Scout Cookie had a mission. New cookie box designs, introduced in fall of 2000, were bold and bright, capturing the spirit of Girl Scouting. Two licensed bakers produced a maximum of eight varieties, and all cookies were kosher. And, much to the excitement of our youngest Girl Scouts, Daisies started selling cookies!

This passage is adapted from “Girl Scout Cookie History,” GirlScouts.org.
 
Based on details given in the passage, what could be a logical reason why the author wrote this passage?

A
to actively recruit new Girl Scouts
B
to thoroughly describe the types of cookies sold
C
to graciously boast about the success of the Girl Scout cookies
D
to comprehensively review the history of the Girl Scouts
Question 20 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). It is clear from the tone of the passage that the author approves of the Girl Scouts and is proud of the accomplishment of the Girl Scouts’ cookie sales, citing the development of “valuable life skills,” and the improvement of communities as a direct result of the program. It is reasonable to assume that the author is mildly boasting about the organization’s development and success. This answer best aligns with the descriptions provided in the first and last paragraphs of the passage. While it is true that a positive description of the program may encourage girls to join the scouts, it is not a primary purpose of the passage. Nor does the author thoroughly describe the cookies sold or the history of the scouts.
Question 21

The History of Girl Scout Cookies

For nearly 100 years, Girl Scouts and their enthusiastic supporters have helped ensure the success of the iconic annual cookie sale — and they’ve had fun, developed valuable life skills, and made their communities a better place every step of the way.

Girl Scout Cookies had their earliest beginnings in the kitchens and ovens of our girl members, with moms volunteering as technical advisers. The sale of cookies as a way to finance troop activities began as early as 1917, five years after Juliette Gordon Low started Girl Scouts in the United States, when the Mistletoe Troop in Muskogee, Oklahoma, baked cookies and sold them in its high school cafeteria as a service project.

In July 1922, The American Girl magazine, published by Girl Scouts of the USA, featured an article by Florence E. Neil, a local director in Chicago, Illinois. Miss Neil provided a cookie recipe that had been given to the council’s 2,000 Girl Scouts. She estimated the approximate cost of ingredients for six- to seven-dozen cookies to be 26 to 36 cents. The cookies, she suggested, could be sold by troops for 25 or 30 cents per dozen.

In 1933, Girl Scouts of Greater Philadelphia Council baked cookies and sold them in the city’s gas and electric company windows. The price was just 23 cents per box of 44 cookies, or six boxes for $1.24! Girls developed their marketing and business skills and raised funds for their local Girl Scout council. A year later, Greater Philadelphia took cookie sales to the next level, becoming the first council to sell commercially baked cookies.

In 1935, the Girl Scout Federation of Greater New York raised money through the sale of commercially baked cookies. Buying its own die in the shape of a trefoil, the group used the words “Girl Scout Cookies” on the box. In 1936, the national Girl Scout organization began the process of licensing the first commercial bakers to produce cookies that would be sold nationwide by girls in Girl Scout councils.

Enthusiasm for Girl Scout Cookies spread nationwide. By 1937, more than 125 Girl Scout councils reported holding cookie sales. In 1951, Girl Scout Cookies came in three varieties: Sandwich, Shortbread, and Chocolate Mints (now known as Thin Mints). By 1966, a number of varieties were available. Among the best sellers were Chocolate Mint (now known as Thin Mints), Shortbread, and Peanut Butter Sandwich cookies. Girl Scout Cookies for sale during the 1970s included Thin Mints, Peanut Butter Sandwich/Do-si-dos®, and Shortbread/Trefoils® cookies, plus four additional choices.

Early in the twenty-first century, every Girl Scout Cookie had a mission. New cookie box designs, introduced in fall of 2000, were bold and bright, capturing the spirit of Girl Scouting. Two licensed bakers produced a maximum of eight varieties, and all cookies were kosher. And, much to the excitement of our youngest Girl Scouts, Daisies started selling cookies!

This passage is adapted from “Girl Scout Cookie History,” GirlScouts.org.
 
Select TWO details that can be learned from the passage?

A
the year in which the Girl Scouts was founded
B
the most profitable cookie type
C
the average number of boxes of cookies sold per Girl Scout
D
The name of the founder of the Girl Scouts
E
the year that Daisies started selling cookies
F
the reason for changing the name of Chocolate Mints
Question 21 Explanation: 
The correct answers are (A) and (D). The second paragraph states, “The sale of cookies as a way to finance troop activities began as early as 1917, five years after Juliette Gordon Low started Girl Scouts in the United States.” This sentence states that Juliette Gordon Low was the founder of the Girl Scouts; and if Low founded the Girl Scouts five years before 1917, then the Girl Scouts must have been founded in 1912.
Question 22

The History of Girl Scout Cookies

For nearly 100 years, Girl Scouts and their enthusiastic supporters have helped ensure the success of the iconic annual cookie sale — and they’ve had fun, developed valuable life skills, and made their communities a better place every step of the way.

Girl Scout Cookies had their earliest beginnings in the kitchens and ovens of our girl members, with moms volunteering as technical advisers. The sale of cookies as a way to finance troop activities began as early as 1917, five years after Juliette Gordon Low started Girl Scouts in the United States, when the Mistletoe Troop in Muskogee, Oklahoma, baked cookies and sold them in its high school cafeteria as a service project.

In July 1922, The American Girl magazine, published by Girl Scouts of the USA, featured an article by Florence E. Neil, a local director in Chicago, Illinois. Miss Neil provided a cookie recipe that had been given to the council’s 2,000 Girl Scouts. She estimated the approximate cost of ingredients for six- to seven-dozen cookies to be 26 to 36 cents. The cookies, she suggested, could be sold by troops for 25 or 30 cents per dozen.

In 1933, Girl Scouts of Greater Philadelphia Council baked cookies and sold them in the city’s gas and electric company windows. The price was just 23 cents per box of 44 cookies, or six boxes for $1.24! Girls developed their marketing and business skills and raised funds for their local Girl Scout council. A year later, Greater Philadelphia took cookie sales to the next level, becoming the first council to sell commercially baked cookies.

In 1935, the Girl Scout Federation of Greater New York raised money through the sale of commercially baked cookies. Buying its own die in the shape of a trefoil, the group used the words “Girl Scout Cookies” on the box. In 1936, the national Girl Scout organization began the process of licensing the first commercial bakers to produce cookies that would be sold nationwide by girls in Girl Scout councils.

Enthusiasm for Girl Scout Cookies spread nationwide. By 1937, more than 125 Girl Scout councils reported holding cookie sales. In 1951, Girl Scout Cookies came in three varieties: Sandwich, Shortbread, and Chocolate Mints (now known as Thin Mints). By 1966, a number of varieties were available. Among the best sellers were Chocolate Mint (now known as Thin Mints), Shortbread, and Peanut Butter Sandwich cookies. Girl Scout Cookies for sale during the 1970s included Thin Mints, Peanut Butter Sandwich/Do-si-dos®, and Shortbread/Trefoils® cookies, plus four additional choices.

Early in the twenty-first century, every Girl Scout Cookie had a mission. New cookie box designs, introduced in fall of 2000, were bold and bright, capturing the spirit of Girl Scouting. Two licensed bakers produced a maximum of eight varieties, and all cookies were kosher. And, much to the excitement of our youngest Girl Scouts, Daisies started selling cookies!

This passage is adapted from “Girl Scout Cookie History,” GirlScouts.org.
 
Read this excerpt from the text

For nearly 100 years, Girl Scouts and their enthusiastic supporters have helped ensure the success of the iconic annual cookie sale — and they’ve had fun, developed valuable life skills, and made their communities a better place every step of the way.
 
The most likely meaning of iconic is?

A
required by a rule
B
pertaining to charity
C
happening once a year
D
widely recognized and well-established
Question 22 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). An icon is something that is revered or idolized. Iconic means "widely known and acknowledged, especially for distinctive excellence." There is no mention of a rule requiring the cookie sale to take place, nor mention of the sale functioning as a charity. The word annual, not iconic, indicates that the sale happens once a year.
Question 23

Camping with the Bears

Sometimes the world can surprise you. What you expect is not always what you get, as the mind is fickle, seduced by fancy. We people are fickle, too, more often than not agreeing blindly with our neighbors. It takes so much more to march an unknown course that none have tread before.

In the summer of 1999, my friend Arika and I set out to camp in Colorado’s San Juan Mountains. The staff were quick to warn us about the bears, and rightfully so because bears could be sighted any given evening in the area. As we drove into the campsite, we saw a handwritten sign warning us about bears again.

We moved at a good speed to establish our camp before nightfall, chatting back and forth. Arika quickly set up the tent under an aspen tree while I cooked an easy meal. After eating, we stuffed the tent full of our sleeping gear, and soon enough settled into silence.

I barely breathed the quiet mountain air. I was listening for bears.

It wasn’t long before I heard a rustling sound, and I held my breath to listen more carefully. A deep growling followed. It was the low guttural noise made only by a large animal. There was silence for a few moments, and then I heard it again.

“Arika,” I said in a panicky whisper. “Wake up! I hear something outside the tent. Do you?” We lay there side by side, and after a few moments, she whispered back that she didn’t hear anything. Arika rolled over on her side, but I stayed lying on my back, legs rigid and arms tense at my sides, ears tuned to the dark world lurking outside.

Sleeping was out of the question. Someone had to be awake to protect us in case of attack, so I volunteered myself. I heard it again, first the rustling sound of a big animal stumbling through fallen leaves, then the low growling that followed. I could see its shadow moving then, dancing lines across the walls of our tent.

“Arika! Wake up right now- I hear it again!"

“Huh? I don’t hear anything.”

“Listen,” I said, but I knew she had just rolled over and gone back to sleep.

The third time I heard the noises, the truth hit me like a clap of thunder. That low, guttural noise was Arika snoring as she slipped into a sound sleep. You’d think that I would have been able to put that together more quickly. But the mind is like a fertile field; plant it with an idea, and that idea will grow to fruition.
 
The author develops the narrative by:

A
using humor to soften the delivery of grim news.
B
explaining the events as a detached observer.
C
maintaining suspense that is eventually resolved.
D
creating unnecessary drama that distracts the reader from the passage's main idea.
Question 23 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). As the author tells the story, suspense builds as readers wonder what the outcome of the encounter will be. The suspense is finally resolved in the concluding paragraph as the author explains what was really happening: the noises were from Arika, not a bear. While the author does use humor, it is not used to deliver grim news. The author uses the first person and includes dialogue, both of which exclude answer choice (B) as valid. Answer choice (D) is incorrect because the passage’s main idea arises through the dramatic elements used by the author; the dramatic elements are integral to the purpose of the story.
Question 24

Camping with the Bears

Sometimes the world can surprise you. What you expect is not always what you get, as the mind is fickle, seduced by fancy. We people are fickle, too, more often than not agreeing blindly with our neighbors. It takes so much more to march an unknown course that none have tread before.

In the summer of 1999, my friend Arika and I set out to camp in Colorado’s San Juan Mountains. The staff were quick to warn us about the bears, and rightfully so because bears could be sighted any given evening in the area. As we drove into the campsite, we saw a handwritten sign warning us about bears again.

We moved at a good speed to establish our camp before nightfall, chatting back and forth. Arika quickly set up the tent under an aspen tree while I cooked an easy meal. After eating, we stuffed the tent full of our sleeping gear, and soon enough settled into silence.

I barely breathed the quiet mountain air. I was listening for bears.

It wasn’t long before I heard a rustling sound, and I held my breath to listen more carefully. A deep growling followed. It was the low guttural noise made only by a large animal. There was silence for a few moments, and then I heard it again.

“Arika,” I said in a panicky whisper. “Wake up! I hear something outside the tent. Do you?” We lay there side by side, and after a few moments, she whispered back that she didn’t hear anything. Arika rolled over on her side, but I stayed lying on my back, legs rigid and arms tense at my sides, ears tuned to the dark world lurking outside.

Sleeping was out of the question. Someone had to be awake to protect us in case of attack, so I volunteered myself. I heard it again, first the rustling sound of a big animal stumbling through fallen leaves, then the low growling that followed. I could see its shadow moving then, dancing lines across the walls of our tent.

“Arika! Wake up right now- I hear it again!"

“Huh? I don’t hear anything.”

“Listen,” I said, but I knew she had just rolled over and gone back to sleep.

The third time I heard the noises, the truth hit me like a clap of thunder. That low, guttural noise was Arika snoring as she slipped into a sound sleep. You’d think that I would have been able to put that together more quickly. But the mind is like a fertile field; plant it with an idea, and that idea will grow to fruition.
 
What is the meaning of the word fickle in paragraph 1?

A
subject to sudden unpredictable change
B
easily offended
C
paranoid
D
steady and faithful
Question 24 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (A). In context, fickle is used to describe entities that lack stability and that are easily swayed or influenced. If one is fickle it means that one is likely to suddenly change opinions or feelings without a valid reason.
Question 25

Camping with the Bears

Sometimes the world can surprise you. What you expect is not always what you get, as the mind is fickle, seduced by fancy. We people are fickle, too, more often than not agreeing blindly with our neighbors. It takes so much more to march an unknown course that none have tread before.

In the summer of 1999, my friend Arika and I set out to camp in Colorado’s San Juan Mountains. The staff were quick to warn us about the bears, and rightfully so because bears could be sighted any given evening in the area. As we drove into the campsite, we saw a handwritten sign warning us about bears again.

We moved at a good speed to establish our camp before nightfall, chatting back and forth. Arika quickly set up the tent under an aspen tree while I cooked an easy meal. After eating, we stuffed the tent full of our sleeping gear, and soon enough settled into silence.

I barely breathed the quiet mountain air. I was listening for bears.

It wasn’t long before I heard a rustling sound, and I held my breath to listen more carefully. A deep growling followed. It was the low guttural noise made only by a large animal. There was silence for a few moments, and then I heard it again.

“Arika,” I said in a panicky whisper. “Wake up! I hear something outside the tent. Do you?” We lay there side by side, and after a few moments, she whispered back that she didn’t hear anything. Arika rolled over on her side, but I stayed lying on my back, legs rigid and arms tense at my sides, ears tuned to the dark world lurking outside.

Sleeping was out of the question. Someone had to be awake to protect us in case of attack, so I volunteered myself. I heard it again, first the rustling sound of a big animal stumbling through fallen leaves, then the low growling that followed. I could see its shadow moving then, dancing lines across the walls of our tent.

“Arika! Wake up right now- I hear it again!"

“Huh? I don’t hear anything.”

“Listen,” I said, but I knew she had just rolled over and gone back to sleep.

The third time I heard the noises, the truth hit me like a clap of thunder. That low, guttural noise was Arika snoring as she slipped into a sound sleep. You’d think that I would have been able to put that together more quickly. But the mind is like a fertile field; plant it with an idea, and that idea will grow to fruition.
 
The author of this passage develops the second, third, and fourth paragraphs primarily through:

A
abstract psychological analysis that offers detailed information about the author's mind.
B
vivid details that appeal to the readers' senses of sight and sound.
C
a logically ordered explanation of events that establishes the source of the following tension.
D
defining a concept in increasingly complex terms.
Question 25 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). These paragraphs are relatively straightforward, describing the events in order to identify bears as the source of the tension that will follow. These paragraphs can be classified as a “set up” that is eventually resolved by the end of the passage.
Question 26

Camping with the Bears

Sometimes the world can surprise you. What you expect is not always what you get, as the mind is fickle, seduced by fancy. We people are fickle, too, more often than not agreeing blindly with our neighbors. It takes so much more to march an unknown course that none have tread before.

In the summer of 1999, my friend Arika and I set out to camp in Colorado’s San Juan Mountains. The staff were quick to warn us about the bears, and rightfully so because bears could be sighted any given evening in the area. As we drove into the campsite, we saw a handwritten sign warning us about bears again.

We moved at a good speed to establish our camp before nightfall, chatting back and forth. Arika quickly set up the tent under an aspen tree while I cooked an easy meal. After eating, we stuffed the tent full of our sleeping gear, and soon enough settled into silence.

I barely breathed the quiet mountain air. I was listening for bears.

It wasn’t long before I heard a rustling sound, and I held my breath to listen more carefully. A deep growling followed. It was the low guttural noise made only by a large animal. There was silence for a few moments, and then I heard it again.

“Arika,” I said in a panicky whisper. “Wake up! I hear something outside the tent. Do you?” We lay there side by side, and after a few moments, she whispered back that she didn’t hear anything. Arika rolled over on her side, but I stayed lying on my back, legs rigid and arms tense at my sides, ears tuned to the dark world lurking outside.

Sleeping was out of the question. Someone had to be awake to protect us in case of attack, so I volunteered myself. I heard it again, first the rustling sound of a big animal stumbling through fallen leaves, then the low growling that followed. I could see its shadow moving then, dancing lines across the walls of our tent.

“Arika! Wake up right now- I hear it again!"

“Huh? I don’t hear anything.”

“Listen,” I said, but I knew she had just rolled over and gone back to sleep.

The third time I heard the noises, the truth hit me like a clap of thunder. That low, guttural noise was Arika snoring as she slipped into a sound sleep. You’d think that I would have been able to put that together more quickly. But the mind is like a fertile field; plant it with an idea, and that idea will grow to fruition.
 
Read this excerpt from the text

We people are fickle, too, more often than not agreeing blindly with our neighbors. It takes so much more to march an unknown course that none have tread before.
 
What is the author saying about people in this excerpt?

A
Courage is an essential part of marching onward with our neighbors.
B
Walking over unmapped territory is a brave thing to do alone.
C
It is often easier for people to embrace the unknown rather than agreeing with our neighbors.
D
It is often difficult for people to make choices that differ from those of others.
Question 26 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). The author describes the ease and willingness with which people agree with their neighbors. This establishes a clear contrast with the immense difficulty of going against the norm and carving one’s own path. The author recognizes this and sympathizes with the struggle people share.
Question 27

Camping with the Bears

Sometimes the world can surprise you. What you expect is not always what you get, as the mind is fickle, seduced by fancy. We people are fickle, too, more often than not agreeing blindly with our neighbors. It takes so much more to march an unknown course that none have tread before.

In the summer of 1999, my friend Arika and I set out to camp in Colorado’s San Juan Mountains. The staff were quick to warn us about the bears, and rightfully so because bears could be sighted any given evening in the area. As we drove into the campsite, we saw a handwritten sign warning us about bears again.

We moved at a good speed to establish our camp before nightfall, chatting back and forth. Arika quickly set up the tent under an aspen tree while I cooked an easy meal. After eating, we stuffed the tent full of our sleeping gear, and soon enough settled into silence.

I barely breathed the quiet mountain air. I was listening for bears.

It wasn’t long before I heard a rustling sound, and I held my breath to listen more carefully. A deep growling followed. It was the low guttural noise made only by a large animal. There was silence for a few moments, and then I heard it again.

“Arika,” I said in a panicky whisper. “Wake up! I hear something outside the tent. Do you?” We lay there side by side, and after a few moments, she whispered back that she didn’t hear anything. Arika rolled over on her side, but I stayed lying on my back, legs rigid and arms tense at my sides, ears tuned to the dark world lurking outside.

Sleeping was out of the question. Someone had to be awake to protect us in case of attack, so I volunteered myself. I heard it again, first the rustling sound of a big animal stumbling through fallen leaves, then the low growling that followed. I could see its shadow moving then, dancing lines across the walls of our tent.

“Arika! Wake up right now- I hear it again!"

“Huh? I don’t hear anything.”

“Listen,” I said, but I knew she had just rolled over and gone back to sleep.

The third time I heard the noises, the truth hit me like a clap of thunder. That low, guttural noise was Arika snoring as she slipped into a sound sleep. You’d think that I would have been able to put that together more quickly. But the mind is like a fertile field; plant it with an idea, and that idea will grow to fruition.
 
Which of these sentences best emphasizes the fear that the author is feeling?

A
The third time I heard the noises, the truth hit me like a clap of thunder.
B
But the mind is like a fertile field; plant it with an idea, and that idea will grow to fruition.
C
Arika rolled over on her side, but I stayed lying on my back, legs rigid and arms tense at my sides, ears tuned to the dark world lurking outside.
D
I could see its shadow moving then, dancing lines across the walls of our tent.
Question 27 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). The phrase, "legs rigid and arms tense at my sides," suggests that the author is frightened. The phrase "dark world lurking outside" adds to this sense of fear as it explicitly describes the author’s fear of the unknown surroundings.
Question 28

Camping with the Bears

Sometimes the world can surprise you. What you expect is not always what you get, as the mind is fickle, seduced by fancy. We people are fickle, too, more often than not agreeing blindly with our neighbors. It takes so much more to march an unknown course that none have tread before.

In the summer of 1999, my friend Arika and I set out to camp in Colorado’s San Juan Mountains. The staff were quick to warn us about the bears, and rightfully so because bears could be sighted any given evening in the area. As we drove into the campsite, we saw a handwritten sign warning us about bears again.

We moved at a good speed to establish our camp before nightfall, chatting back and forth. Arika quickly set up the tent under an aspen tree while I cooked an easy meal. After eating, we stuffed the tent full of our sleeping gear, and soon enough settled into silence.

I barely breathed the quiet mountain air. I was listening for bears.

It wasn’t long before I heard a rustling sound, and I held my breath to listen more carefully. A deep growling followed. It was the low guttural noise made only by a large animal. There was silence for a few moments, and then I heard it again.

“Arika,” I said in a panicky whisper. “Wake up! I hear something outside the tent. Do you?” We lay there side by side, and after a few moments, she whispered back that she didn’t hear anything. Arika rolled over on her side, but I stayed lying on my back, legs rigid and arms tense at my sides, ears tuned to the dark world lurking outside.

Sleeping was out of the question. Someone had to be awake to protect us in case of attack, so I volunteered myself. I heard it again, first the rustling sound of a big animal stumbling through fallen leaves, then the low growling that followed. I could see its shadow moving then, dancing lines across the walls of our tent.

“Arika! Wake up right now- I hear it again!"

“Huh? I don’t hear anything.”

“Listen,” I said, but I knew she had just rolled over and gone back to sleep.

The third time I heard the noises, the truth hit me like a clap of thunder. That low, guttural noise was Arika snoring as she slipped into a sound sleep. You’d think that I would have been able to put that together more quickly. But the mind is like a fertile field; plant it with an idea, and that idea will grow to fruition.
 
The author's comparison of the mind to a "fertile field" in the final paragraph is useful because it:

A
reveals the author’s interest in farming.
B
provides an image of something ripe for blossoming, depending on what is planted.
C
defines a concept that would make sense through no other comparison.
D
shows that the author's mind is unusual and prone to paranoia.
Question 28 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). The author's comparison of the mind to a fertile field provides an image that can better explain how these two are alike when something (in the case of the passage, an idea) is planted inside of it. The comparison helps explain how the author could mistake snoring for bear noises outside a tent, given the author’s established fear of encountering a bear while on the trip.
Question 29

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a women’s rights activist and a leader in the movement that eventually secured American women the right to vote. Her early education, upbringing, and interest in social matters set her on a path of leadership, and she inspired other men and women to take up the cause as well.

Unlike other activists such as Susan B. Anthony, who was clearly focused on the issue of voting rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton wanted to promote the broader issue of women’s rights and address issues such as women’s custody and property rights, employment and income rights, divorce laws, birth control, and abortion. Even though Anthony and Stanton disagreed on the focus of the women’s rights movement, they remained friends and continued working together towards voting rights for women.

Stanton remained focused on her work, writing many important books, documents, and speeches for the women’s rights movement. She also traveled and lectured widely, earning money to pay for her sons to attend college. Stanton promoted voting rights for women in several states, and she made an unsuccessful attempt to secure a U.S. Congressional seat from New York.

As Stanton grew older, she became more active internationally, and in 1888, she worked to found the International Council of Women. In the U.S., it took until 1890 for the divided supporters of the women’s rights movement to eventually reunite as the National American Woman Suffrage Association, and Stanton became the organization’s first president. After spending over five decades working towards equal rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton died in 1902, still some twenty years before women gained the right to vote.

Because of her controversial ideas, Elizabeth Cady Stanton was initially overshadowed by Susan B. Anthony, who was more often recognized as the founder of the women’s rights movement. Over time, however, formal recognition of Stanton’s work has increased. Today, Elizabeth Cady Stanton is rightly acknowledged for taking a founding role in the movement that secured voting rights for women and for shaping the broader movement towards more equal rights for women in society at large.
 
Based on how she is described in the passage, Elizabeth Cady Stanton can best be characterized as:

A
politically concerned and socially moderate
B
socially active and somewhat controversial
C
hard-working and personally compliant
D
intelligent, but mildly frustrating
Question 29 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). Throughout the passage it can be seen how Stanton remained socially active throughout her life as an activist for women’s rights. The passage also reveals that Stanton was a controversial figure. The descriptor “somewhat” agrees with the overall tone of the passage because even though Stanton was controversial, she was able to maintain her friendship with Anthony and eventually become president of a united group of female activists. Her controversial nature did not, in the end, isolate her from the movement, and the last paragraph tells us that she is rightfully acknowledged for her work despite her controversial ideas.
Question 30

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a women’s rights activist and a leader in the movement that eventually secured American women the right to vote. Her early education, upbringing, and interest in social matters set her on a path of leadership, and she inspired other men and women to take up the cause as well.

Unlike other activists such as Susan B. Anthony, who was clearly focused on the issue of voting rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton wanted to promote the broader issue of women’s rights and address issues such as women’s custody and property rights, employment and income rights, divorce laws, birth control, and abortion. Even though Anthony and Stanton disagreed on the focus of the women’s rights movement, they remained friends and continued working together towards voting rights for women.

Stanton remained focused on her work, writing many important books, documents, and speeches for the women’s rights movement. She also traveled and lectured widely, earning money to pay for her sons to attend college. Stanton promoted voting rights for women in several states, and she made an unsuccessful attempt to secure a U.S. Congressional seat from New York.

As Stanton grew older, she became more active internationally, and in 1888, she worked to found the International Council of Women. In the U.S., it took until 1890 for the divided supporters of the women’s rights movement to eventually reunite as the National American Woman Suffrage Association, and Stanton became the organization’s first president. After spending over five decades working towards equal rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton died in 1902, still some twenty years before women gained the right to vote.

Because of her controversial ideas, Elizabeth Cady Stanton was initially overshadowed by Susan B. Anthony, who was more often recognized as the founder of the women’s rights movement. Over time, however, formal recognition of Stanton’s work has increased. Today, Elizabeth Cady Stanton is rightly acknowledged for taking a founding role in the movement that secured voting rights for women and for shaping the broader movement towards more equal rights for women in society at large.
 
The author of this passage presents Stanton’s views as controversial because Stanton:

A
remained focused on broader reform for women, while others focused only on voting rights
B
worked for the abolition of slavery before she began to work for women's rights
C
stayed at home and wrote speeches while Susan B. Anthony traveled to conferences
D
modeled her Declaration of Sentiments after the U.S. Declaration of Independence
Question 30 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (A). The correct answer to this question will be explicitly stated in the passage. Always verify your answer by locating in the passage the information that supports your choice. In this case, paragraph 4 explicitly states that Stanton had “controversial ideas.” The second paragraph suggests that Stanton was controversial because she wanted to work towards broader reforms for women, while other activists remained focused only on voting rights. Out of all the answer choices, only answer choice (A) offers a reason for the controversy surrounding Stanton’s work.
Question 31

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a women’s rights activist and a leader in the movement that eventually secured American women the right to vote. Her early education, upbringing, and interest in social matters set her on a path of leadership, and she inspired other men and women to take up the cause as well.

Unlike other activists such as Susan B. Anthony, who was clearly focused on the issue of voting rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton wanted to promote the broader issue of women’s rights and address issues such as women’s custody and property rights, employment and income rights, divorce laws, birth control, and abortion. Even though Anthony and Stanton disagreed on the focus of the women’s rights movement, they remained friends and continued working together towards voting rights for women.

Stanton remained focused on her work, writing many important books, documents, and speeches for the women’s rights movement. She also traveled and lectured widely, earning money to pay for her sons to attend college. Stanton promoted voting rights for women in several states, and she made an unsuccessful attempt to secure a U.S. Congressional seat from New York.

As Stanton grew older, she became more active internationally, and in 1888, she worked to found the International Council of Women. In the U.S., it took until 1890 for the divided supporters of the women’s rights movement to eventually reunite as the National American Woman Suffrage Association, and Stanton became the organization’s first president. After spending over five decades working towards equal rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton died in 1902, still some twenty years before women gained the right to vote.

Because of her controversial ideas, Elizabeth Cady Stanton was initially overshadowed by Susan B. Anthony, who was more often recognized as the founder of the women’s rights movement. Over time, however, formal recognition of Stanton’s work has increased. Today, Elizabeth Cady Stanton is rightly acknowledged for taking a founding role in the movement that secured voting rights for women and for shaping the broader movement towards more equal rights for women in society at large.
 
Based on the passage, Elizabeth Cady Stanton worked towards all of the following EXCEPT:

A
voting rights for women
B
marriage and divorce rights for women
C
custody and property rights for women
D
relaxing women's dress code standards
Question 31 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). The phrase “based on the passage” indicates that the correct answer will be found by using information explicitly stated in the passage. However, because the question includes the word “EXCEPT,” the correct answer will be the answer choice that is NOT found in the passage. Always be aware of the wording of the question. This passage does not mention whether Stanton worked towards relaxing women’s dress code standards. Additionally, if you have read the passage carefully, this answer choice should be obvious because it is the only answer choice that does not focus directly on a social or political cause important to Stanton, which is the overarching idea of the passage.
Question 32

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a women’s rights activist and a leader in the movement that eventually secured American women the right to vote. Her early education, upbringing, and interest in social matters set her on a path of leadership, and she inspired other men and women to take up the cause as well.

Unlike other activists such as Susan B. Anthony, who was clearly focused on the issue of voting rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton wanted to promote the broader issue of women’s rights and address issues such as women’s custody and property rights, employment and income rights, divorce laws, birth control, and abortion. Even though Anthony and Stanton disagreed on the focus of the women’s rights movement, they remained friends and continued working together towards voting rights for women.

Stanton remained focused on her work, writing many important books, documents, and speeches for the women’s rights movement. She also traveled and lectured widely, earning money to pay for her sons to attend college. Stanton promoted voting rights for women in several states, and she made an unsuccessful attempt to secure a U.S. Congressional seat from New York.

As Stanton grew older, she became more active internationally, and in 1888, she worked to found the International Council of Women. In the U.S., it took until 1890 for the divided supporters of the women’s rights movement to eventually reunite as the National American Woman Suffrage Association, and Stanton became the organization’s first president. After spending over five decades working towards equal rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton died in 1902, still some twenty years before women gained the right to vote.

Because of her controversial ideas, Elizabeth Cady Stanton was initially overshadowed by Susan B. Anthony, who was more often recognized as the founder of the women’s rights movement. Over time, however, formal recognition of Stanton’s work has increased. Today, Elizabeth Cady Stanton is rightly acknowledged for taking a founding role in the movement that secured voting rights for women and for shaping the broader movement towards more equal rights for women in society at large.
 
According to the passage, Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s work with the women’s rights movement can best be described as:

A
narrow-minded and ultimately unsuccessful
B
valuable yet forgotten
C
ambitious and overly idealistic
D
broadly focused and socially significant
Question 32 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). The passage mentions several times that Stanton focused on a broad platform of improvements for women. Voting rights was one part of her progressive vision. The introductory and concluding paragraphs indicate that her work was significant, as women did gain the right to vote, and they also show that her work shaped the ongoing movement towards more equal rights for women in society at large.
Question 33

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a women’s rights activist and a leader in the movement that eventually secured American women the right to vote. Her early education, upbringing, and interest in social matters set her on a path of leadership, and she inspired other men and women to take up the cause as well.

Unlike other activists such as Susan B. Anthony, who was clearly focused on the issue of voting rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton wanted to promote the broader issue of women’s rights and address issues such as women’s custody and property rights, employment and income rights, divorce laws, birth control, and abortion. Even though Anthony and Stanton disagreed on the focus of the women’s rights movement, they remained friends and continued working together towards voting rights for women.

Stanton remained focused on her work, writing many important books, documents, and speeches for the women’s rights movement. She also traveled and lectured widely, earning money to pay for her sons to attend college. Stanton promoted voting rights for women in several states, and she made an unsuccessful attempt to secure a U.S. Congressional seat from New York.

As Stanton grew older, she became more active internationally, and in 1888, she worked to found the International Council of Women. In the U.S., it took until 1890 for the divided supporters of the women’s rights movement to eventually reunite as the National American Woman Suffrage Association, and Stanton became the organization’s first president. After spending over five decades working towards equal rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton died in 1902, still some twenty years before women gained the right to vote.

Because of her controversial ideas, Elizabeth Cady Stanton was initially overshadowed by Susan B. Anthony, who was more often recognized as the founder of the women’s rights movement. Over time, however, formal recognition of Stanton’s work has increased. Today, Elizabeth Cady Stanton is rightly acknowledged for taking a founding role in the movement that secured voting rights for women and for shaping the broader movement towards more equal rights for women in society at large.
 
Which of the following statements can be inferred from the passage?

A
The supporters of the women’s rights movement remained divided even after the formation of the National American Woman Suffrage Association.
B
Elizabeth Cady Stanton was recognized as a founding member of the women’s rights movement before her death in 1902.
C
Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s support for the broader issue of women’s rights was not restricted to the United States.
D
Elizabeth Cady Stanton was never married because she devoted her entire life to promoting equal rights for women.
Question 33 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). Paragraph 4 states that “as Stanton grew older, she became more active internationally, and in 1888, she worked to found the International Council of Women.” Because of her international involvement, it is clear that her work was not restricted to the US. None of the other answer choices can be inferred from the passage.
Question 34

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a women’s rights activist and a leader in the movement that eventually secured American women the right to vote. Her early education, upbringing, and interest in social matters set her on a path of leadership, and she inspired other men and women to take up the cause as well.

Unlike other activists such as Susan B. Anthony, who was clearly focused on the issue of voting rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton wanted to promote the broader issue of women’s rights and address issues such as women’s custody and property rights, employment and income rights, divorce laws, birth control, and abortion. Even though Anthony and Stanton disagreed on the focus of the women’s rights movement, they remained friends and continued working together towards voting rights for women.

Stanton remained focused on her work, writing many important books, documents, and speeches for the women’s rights movement. She also traveled and lectured widely, earning money to pay for her sons to attend college. Stanton promoted voting rights for women in several states, and she made an unsuccessful attempt to secure a U.S. Congressional seat from New York.

As Stanton grew older, she became more active internationally, and in 1888, she worked to found the International Council of Women. In the U.S., it took until 1890 for the divided supporters of the women’s rights movement to eventually reunite as the National American Woman Suffrage Association, and Stanton became the organization’s first president. After spending over five decades working towards equal rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton died in 1902, still some twenty years before women gained the right to vote.

Because of her controversial ideas, Elizabeth Cady Stanton was initially overshadowed by Susan B. Anthony, who was more often recognized as the founder of the women’s rights movement. Over time, however, formal recognition of Stanton’s work has increased. Today, Elizabeth Cady Stanton is rightly acknowledged for taking a founding role in the movement that secured voting rights for women and for shaping the broader movement towards more equal rights for women in society at large.
 
Based on the description in the final paragraph, which of the following statements would the author most likely make with regard to Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s place in history?

A
Elizabeth Cady Stanton was forgotten over time because other female activists did more important work.
B
Elizabeth Cady Stanton's controversial ideas kept her from being immediately recognized for her work, but she now receives the credit she deserves.
C
Elizabeth Cady Stanton was too controversial to have a lasting effect on the women's rights movement.
D
Elizabeth Cady Stanton does not deserve to receive more recognition than she already does because her ideas caused divisions among supporters of the women's rights movement.
Question 34 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). All of the ideas expressed in this answer choice are also expressed in the passage’s final paragraph. The key points are that Stanton was not initially recognized for her work because she supported broad and controversial ideas. However, the author says that Stanton is now “rightfully acknowledged” for her work, which means that the author believes she now receives the credit she deserves.
Question 35

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a women’s rights activist and a leader in the movement that eventually secured American women the right to vote. Her early education, upbringing, and interest in social matters set her on a path of leadership, and she inspired other men and women to take up the cause as well.

Unlike other activists such as Susan B. Anthony, who was clearly focused on the issue of voting rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton wanted to promote the broader issue of women’s rights and address issues such as women’s custody and property rights, employment and income rights, divorce laws, birth control, and abortion. Even though Anthony and Stanton disagreed on the focus of the women’s rights movement, they remained friends and continued working together towards voting rights for women.

Stanton remained focused on her work, writing many important books, documents, and speeches for the women’s rights movement. She also traveled and lectured widely, earning money to pay for her sons to attend college. Stanton promoted voting rights for women in several states, and she made an unsuccessful attempt to secure a U.S. Congressional seat from New York.

As Stanton grew older, she became more active internationally, and in 1888, she worked to found the International Council of Women. In the U.S., it took until 1890 for the divided supporters of the women’s rights movement to eventually reunite as the National American Woman Suffrage Association, and Stanton became the organization’s first president. After spending over five decades working towards equal rights for women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton died in 1902, still some twenty years before women gained the right to vote.

Because of her controversial ideas, Elizabeth Cady Stanton was initially overshadowed by Susan B. Anthony, who was more often recognized as the founder of the women’s rights movement. Over time, however, formal recognition of Stanton’s work has increased. Today, Elizabeth Cady Stanton is rightly acknowledged for taking a founding role in the movement that secured voting rights for women and for shaping the broader movement towards more equal rights for women in society at large.
 
How does the word unlike in paragraph 2 function in this passage?

A
It suggests that Stanton was unlike any other feminist that had come before her.
B
It introduces the idea that Stanton was somehow distinct in her philosophy.
C
It implies that there was a personal and professional rivalry between Anthony and Stanton.
D
It reveals that Stanton was not like her male counterparts in terms of the political and social philosophies she held.
Question 35 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). The passage states that Anthony and Stanton “remained friends,” so choice (C) does not make sense given this information. The passage does not provide details about feminists who came before Stanton, so choice (A) is not a supported assumption. No male activists are discussed in the passage, so choice (D) is beyond the scope and cannot be the correct answer. Only choice (B) makes sense within the context of the paragraph. Stanton was unique in certain ways, and disagreed with Anthony in terms of what they should focus on to achieve progress.
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